A New Witness To Roswell?

In 2017 reports surfaced of a previously unknown witness to the Roswell crash. Author and researcher Philip Mantle investigated the claims with MUFON.

Released in 2017 the book UFOs TODAY – 70 Years of Lies, Misinformation and Government Cover-Ups by Irena Scott PhD contains an amount of controversial and thought provoking information as the title of the book might suggest. If I were a gambling man I would bet on one piece of information in this book being the most controversial within its pages. With it being the 70th anniversary of the Roswell Incident last year, an event that many claim was the crash of a space vehicle from an ET origin, the news that an alleged new witness emerging might not be that big a surprise.


In 2012 I was contacted by a gentleman called Scott Ferguson. Scott was part of a production company called White Tiger Films. He explained to me that he had some information on the Roswell Incident that he would like me to take a look at. I had first to sign a non-disclosure agreement which I did. Once this was signed I was sent what Scott called his ‘Roswell File’. He was looking to possibly make a movie based around this file and asked if I could help research the alleged witness. I of course agreed. The ‘Roswell File’ consisted of a transcript of an interview with the alleged witness Charles H. Forgus, a video interview with him and a photo as well. The story of how White Tiger Films obtained this material is I would say quite unique.

To view the full article click here.


The Mojave Incident

It’s one of the most frightening alien abduction events of recent times yet few have heard of it. We spoke to Ron Felber, author of Mojave Incident.

When you think of alien abductees your mind immediately flashes the names Travis Walton, Betty & Barney Hill and Whitley Strieber, maybe even Samantha Mulder, sister of The X-Files’ Fox Mulder? You may also get the names Betty Andreasson or Antonio Villa-Boas if you’re particularly clued up. What you probably won’t think of are the names of Californian couple, Steve and Dawn Hess. Their experience and subsequent hypnotic regression is covered in a book, by crime author Ron Felber, called The Mojave Incident and it is a truly terrifying and, at times, mentally draining read. We spoke to Ron about the Hess’, their first meeting through a mutual friend and the hypnotic regression sessions where the truth of their experience was finally revealed. Before we get to Ron we’ll relate the incident itself that haunted the couple over the space of two years, pushing them to breaking point.

As Steve was pointing out various constellations Dawn drew
his attention to an even brighter object.

On the weekend of 20th and 21st October 1989 the young couple had scheduled a weekend trip to the Mojave foothills in Steve’s fathers truck, leaving their two small children in the care of his parents. The pair were looking forward to the trip and after a minor success on the slots at Whiskey Pete’s casino just inside the Nevada border, they were headed for the Midhills camping ground when inclement weather meant a night in the truck by the side of the road. By morning the fog and mist had cleared and they started on towards Midhills again. Situated between the New York and Providence Mountains, and 70 miles southwest of Las Vegas as the crow flies, the camping ground is pretty much in the middle of nowhere, with dusty uneven roads leading to a perfect retreat away from the bustle of city life…

To read the full article click here.


Ryan Sprague

It’s been quite the twelve months for screenwriter Ryan Sprague. His book Somewhere In The Skies: A Human Approach To The Alien Phenomenon is a very different beast to the usual UFO abduction books in that, as the title suggests, it focusses on the human aspects. What Ryan did is unique. Rather than stick to the tried and tested, and tired, clinical approach to the abduction phenomena he explored the emotional after-effects on the abductees with astounding and at times heartbreaking effect.

Not content with solely promoting the book though, he decided to launch his own complementary podcast radio show Somewhere In The Skies. Going from strength to strength and having clocked up a further 36 episodes since April at the time of writing, Ryan is primed to be one of the hottest new radio hosts in the alternative community.

SOYM: Let’s start with the book, what was the inspiration that compelled you to write ‘Somewhere In The Skies…’ from a human perspective?

Ryan Sprague: Endless books about UFOs have covered a UFO event, the time it happened, the place, and what the other proposes it may have been. I wanted to do something vastly different and actually contribute to progressing the UFO conversation. So I took a very personal approach. While I related UFO events, I focussed more on the individual having the experience. I wanted to know how the event was perceived by them, and how it affected their life in every way possible. Whatever is happening in our skies, it starts, and in my opinion, ultimately ends with the observer and experiencer. The human aspect of the UFO question should not be ignored, and can lead to some amazing discoveries. And perhaps equally as important; new questions being asked.

For the full interview read the issue here.


The Dyatlov Pass Incident, 1959

The Dyatlov Pass Incident is one of the more mysterious events in the alternative community so we asked writer Simon Bradley who had no prior knowledge of the event to examine the evidence and draw his conclusions…

In January 1959, ten young experienced hikers left the relative comforts of the town of Sverdlovsk, and headed across snow-covered country to Mount Otorten in the northern Urals. One member had to turn back through illness but the remaining nine never made it and their badly damaged tent was finally found on February 27th. Five bodies in various states of undress were found nearby. The four remaining bodies weren’t found until a thaw two months later. Some of the bodies had unexplainable injuries and despite an increasing number of theories the causes of their death has never been determined.

So what happened on the slopes of Kholat Syakhl on the night of 2nd February 1959? Let’s find out…

Dyatlov Group tent is discovered
The tent of the Dyatlov group was discovered slashed, from the inside. via Wikimedia


“I didn’t know a single thing about the incident that took place on the eastern slopes of Kholat Syakhl, or the ‘Mountain of the Dead’, in the Northern Russian Urals in early 1959. What happened to nine accomplished winter hikers just 16 km from their Mount Otorten goal, in an area made so notorious by events that it’s subsequently been named after the expedition’s doomed leader Igor Dyatlov?

Whilst chewing the story over and embarking on some background research I was, perhaps due to the similarly sub-zero nature of the tragic events, drawn to the tale of polar explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott whose heartbreaking demise in 1912, and that of his team, is eloquently yet harrowingly described in his Sledging Journals liberated from that final camp a year later. The fact that no comparable testimonies from any of the nine victims of Dyatlov Pass were made shows, at the outset, that their deaths were hardly something they expected: they were enthusiastic diarists up to the night of 1st February.

Let’s just take a minute to establish Mount Otorten’s location. Like anywhere in Siberia the distances involved are awe-inspiring. Situated in the northern province of Sverdlovsk Oblast it’s approximately 2,100km north east of Moscow, 550km or so north of Yekaterinberg, the nearest town of any size, and over 50km into the wilderness from the team’s ultimate starting point, the frozen hamlet of Vizhay. At 1,234m it’s not even as tall as Britain’s loftiest peak, Ben Nevis, but no doubt contributing to the mystery of the unfolding events, ‘otorten’, in the local Mansi people’s language, apparently translates as ‘don’t go there’…

Full the full article read the magazine here.

Nick Pope

Nick Pope has been in the UK media a lot recently, talking about conspiracy theories. You can almost sense the tired resignation in the printed words as once more he’s asked about the existence of Nibiru or Planet X by an increasingly unimaginative UK tabloid press. And when he’s not replying to journalist after sniggering journalist trying to make sense of tin-foil hat topics, he can be found embroiled in social media battles debating followers of that great medieval fantasy – flat earth theory – when he’s not being mistaken for a Premier League goalkeeper anyway.

Nick Pope 2

Now a resident of the US state of Arizona, Nick Pope left the MOD in 2006 after a distinguished service spanning over two decades. But in 1993, a couple of years into a new post, the advent of a certain UFO and conspiracy-themed tv-show suddenly propelled Nick in to the media spotlight. The unexpected popularity of The X-Files saw the MoD inundated with requests for information regarding whether UFO files existed in their archives. Pope was given the unofficial designated role of press liaison which subsequently earned him the public nickname ‘the real Fox Mulder’. We spoke to Nick about his MoD career, his writing and his contribution to the release of the UK’s UFO files into the public.

SOYM: When did you first join the MoD?

Nick Pope: I joined the Ministry of Defence in 1985 and served there for 21 years, in a number of different postings, at increasingly senior grades as my career progressed. I was assigned to the MoD’s UFO project in 1991 and held this position until 1994, when I was promoted to the next grade up. Before being assigned to this position I had no interest in UFOs and no particular beliefs on the subject. To me, it was just another government job – albeit a bizarre and fascinating one!

To read the full interview read the magazine here…